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violence. all of your efforts. this started. eleven have always. some kind of environment. this case. many of them -- >> okay. first question, yes. a lot did actually have a lot of spin-off benefits. that is a lemon scent. because these laws were passed and there was such a nationwide applaud that the government began -- the parliament became open to the other laws. there we took the other laws that got past because of this one. and also, the issue is so tabooed, even the sexual assault and rape, and these issues are also so tabooed that now people are starting to even the president and prime master and the speeches of the anti sexual-harassment law. okay. now the world is getting very popular. so now it is almost creating a space where even in cestus coming out of the space. so rather than saying incest was it would not to run television a lot of sexual violence and sexual assault and rape is also coming, which is heated. fine. other terms. for example, rape, we do not have that yet. but we are coming close. when is that the case of the new york. we had it outside the un system. this big
started working war college, every faculty member was high up as a full professor. in an environment where they are so right conscious, the idea of hiring people, all faculty members as a full professor is just unheard of and hurt the institutional credibility. trying to explain that to a kernel of why they should not be a full professor fell on ears. this is a problem how to administrators who really have no experience is part of the problem. the other part of the problem and i'll be honest i'll be writing a following chapter of the department chair from the naval war college, captain tony were body are doing a book chapter that was the oversight? with the supervision? there to supervising organizations with something called military education coordinating council -- the military loves acronyms. a part of the pentagon called the g7, part of the joint staff. the congress is busy. we on the sequestration is basically taking up all of their time. the economy. now that allows those in the pentagon and those that this military coordinating council, to basically it our what i've been told they
is above sea level rise and certainly when we talk about the environment. as the title of this panel says, along green view. it is absolutely about how the complexities of human decision making, human settlement, individual ambition, always contradictory emotions of people have shape not only what the environment is, we impact it and give them access. but how we think of it to my we formulate the idea of the wild and now often that is based on these often very self-serving tropes that we invented. so the environment is about history, human action. and in this but what i tried to do is to show how some of those crosscurrents work. he said sell thing boils down to the final decisive battle but against the indians to have been an extremely aggressive northern plains tribe who had been the ones first to master horses and had arranged absolutely right through the yellowstone country hunting in the fire all, for example. once there were dealt with the exploration could continue, but one last cautionary note goes back to the question of prison. i think it is very easy when people look at this bo
every time i walked into the room because that would change the environment. i change the environment because i was always present but i didn't always want him to interact because i really wanted to document real moments and not change anything. so, that was my role. >> host: you write that it was magical whenever president bush and his father were together. there are a lot of photos of the two presidents bush in this book. >> guest: first of all they look so alike which is really interesting and anytime they were together it was like history in the making because you have two presidents together, father and son. the second son of the president to become president and it was always really interesting photographing them together as a family. they are so normal in lots of ways other than the fact that they are two presidents together. i really enjoyed documenting the family and the entire bush family. >> host: and did you get to know mrs. bush as well? >> guest: i did. >> host: i want to ask about this photo on a very very long couch. how did this come about? >> guest: this was inside t
. the whole idea of the urban environment derailed, but the plans put forward for the park and for the national park. the same state and federal officials of the philadelphians are dealing with for the u.n. proposal were the ones who also were going to sign off on the part. this interesting connections there certainly. >> charlene, just being aware of time is here, but to continue the dialogue. i'd like to thank her again for her presentation. [applause] >> where the conservative book local action conference in washington d.c. with author paul kengor of "the communist." who was frank marshall davis? >> frank marshall davis was born in kansas 1905, died and made you and 87. ended up in chicago and ultimately honolulu and that's where he would meet a young man named barack obama in the 70s. he was introduced by obama's grandfather, stanley dunham. i should back up a little bit. he was african-american. he was a republican from the time of lincoln to fdr. remarkably what so far to the left that during world war ii he joined the communist party. he joined communist party u.s.a.
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
audiences. but in the modern media environment people target small nations and how do i get young males or the latest women or black people? and some have decided to use prejudice, stereotypes to draw the audience to keep them on that platform. so what i try to do is explore that a little bit and describe what that is happening to help people diffuse these things so they can recognize and they see it on fox news, a msnbc or the drug report they have a sense of what is going on and they're made more media at aliterate and can respond in a way that made sense for growth. you made the term coded language? >> one of the great successes of the civil-rights movement be reached a point* where our racism is marginalized and demonize, rejected. when people want to talk in these ways to invoke prejudice is that they often end news coded language. they say something that comes close to what they mean. if you see newt gingrich running for the said g.o.p. and the one double talking about how more people on food stamps during the barack obama presidency and you can dispute that figure or not. but the
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7